Spiral

The spiral is probably the oldest known symbol of human spirituality. The spiral has been in rock carvings thousands of years old, on every continent in the world. The religious significance can only be guessed at, but it has been found on tombs, and almost certainly has a connection with the sun, which traces a spiral shape every three months in its travels. The double spiral found in neolithic Celtic stone art also follows the path of the sun, describing the movements of the heavenly body over the course of a solar year.

A triple spiral motif found on Celtic tombs is drawn unicursally (that is, in one continuous line), suggesting a cycle of rebirth or resurrection. (this hypothesis is bolstered by the fact that many of these appear to be deliberately placed where they catch the first rays of the sun on the solstice). The sun, dying and rising every day, is a natural symbol of rebirth, and the triple spiral gives an obvious connection between the solar symbolism and the nine months of human gestation. In modern times, the spiral is still spiritually significant. The spiral is the symbol of spirit in Wicca, an emblem of the Goddess.

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Religious Symbol Dictionary | symboldictionary.net
November 30, 2009 at 1:04 pm

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EARRACH July 28, 2013 at 1:57 pm

The simple, single-lane, spiral you are using as the hallmark for this “Druid/Celtic” category is virtually absent in all of Celtic art and archeology. The recursive spiral as seen in each of the lobes of the NewGrange Triple spiral is commonly associated with Celtic art, although the people of the New Grange construction period predate the Celts and their Druids by about as much as those Celts and Druids (and Julius Caesar) predate our own time. The recursive spiral did reemerge in their time though in the LeTene style of Celtic art which originated in central Europe and spread to Britain and them to Ireland where it was then re-exported back to Britain and the Continent during the time of the Roman Empire and still evident in the heyday of Celtic Christian illumination from 600ce.-1100ce. BTW, there is NO evidence of any “Celtic knotwork” much older than that period; knotwork arrived with Christianity and their exposure to the motifs of the eastern Mediterranean and Middle East.

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Jennifer October 14, 2013 at 8:52 pm

There are several spirals throughout the dictionary that all link to this entry, which is a generic entry for “spiral.”

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Albert February 16, 2013 at 10:31 am

Been researching upon the significance of the Double Spiral and found that it is practically related to the concept of duality, the stationary terminal points interpretable as the Midday and Midnight Sun. Very interesting, this spiral conceals a wealth of esoteric knowledge. Authentic!

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petra August 10, 2012 at 8:05 pm

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