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animal protectors

This mysterious bird-headed figure, referred to casually as the “Birdman,” is one of many strange symbols found on inscribed wooden tablets written by the early people of Rapanui (Easter Island.) The tablets have never been translated, but are believed to have been religious in nature.

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Manaia

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The heartline is found on Zuni fetish drawings of animals; it represents the breath as the life force of the animal.


 

Amulets containing heart line drawings are considered powerful talismans.

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One of many stylized representations of a mythical sea creature of the Northern Native tribes. Known to the Haida people as Wasgo, and to the Tlingit people, Gonakadet, the Sea-Wolf.

This creature, who is part wolf, part whale, figures in numerous folk tales about a young man who uses the skin of a sea creature for night fishing; he is caught by a pair of whales who punish his deception by transforming him into a creature of the sea.

Older pictographic representations of Wasgo reveal a creature very similar to the horned serpent Avanyu.

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This gigantic earthwork best known as the “Uffington Horse,” is located on a hillside in Oxfordshire, England, and dates to the Bronze age. Measuring almost four hundred feet long, the figure was created by filling dug trenches with powdered chalk.

The horse is one of many chalk figures scatted across the English countryside. It has been speculated that the horse is possibly a remnant of worship of the Celtic Goddess Epona, or the sun God Belenus. Others note the extended tail and contend that the “horse” is actually a dragon.  The figure may be a remnant part of a giant zodiac comprised of chalk figures, the majority of which are now missing.

Ballymote
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celticcelticceltic

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The ubiquitous Welsh Dragon at left is the national symbol of Wales. This particular image appears on the flag of Wales and is derived from an ancient standard of the Tudor family, which is in turn derived from the ‘Draco’ standard of the Roman Legion.

Although attempts have been made to link the dragon with Arthurian tales of Merlin and his prophetic vision of battling dragons- red for Wales and white for England- the emblem has been in use in Wales for at least twelve hundred years.

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