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goddess

 tanitThis symbol is found on many ancient stone carvings, and represents the Goddess Tanit.

Tanit was the Carthaginian and Phoenician Goddess of the moon. Tanit was the Patron of Carthage and the consort of the god Baal. She may have been related to the goddess Astarte/Ishtar.

Bulla showing symbol of Tanit
Bulla amulet depicting Tanit

 

 

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Tanit on a stele with wands and celestial symbols

 

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A symbol of the Mesopotamian Goddess Ishtar (Anath, Astarte, Inanna). The eight points represent the movements of the planet Venus associated with this Goddess, and the eight gates of the city of Babylon.


Ishtar

Related Symbols:

Sign of TanitKnot of Inanna

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This is a simplified image of the design that graces the cover of the Chalice Well at Glastonbury, designed in the nineteenth century by archaeologist Bligh Bond. Crafted of wrought iron and wood, it depicts the Vesica Pisces, a symbol of the divine feminine, and Excalibur, the sword of the legendary King Arthur, who is believed by some to be buried at Glastonbury.

The wellspring at Glastonbury is considered to be one of England’s most Holy sites. The well itself dates back over two thousand years, and was sacred to both early Pagans and the Christians who later built an abbey on the site. Today, the well is a place of pilgrimage for Christians and Pagans alike, many of whom believe the red, iron rich water has healing and miraculous properties. The vesica Pisces theme is repeated in the shape of the pool at the base of the hill, where the water from the spring flows.

An old legend holds that after the crucifixion, Joseph of Arimathea traveled to England and hid the Holy Grail on the premises, accounting for the water’s red hue. Modern Neopagans who use the site equate the waters with the menstruum of the Goddess.

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The cover in situ. The Pool.
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Related Symbols:
Green manHecate's wheelVesica pisces
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The ostrich feather is the emblem of the Egyptian Goddess embodying justice, Ma’at. Egyptians believed that at the time of death, the feather was weighed against the heart of the deceased.

A heart made heavy by sin outweighed the feather and was devoured by the monster Ammit, but a light heart meant the individual was free from sin and entitled to join Osiris in the underworld. (The origin of the phrase “light hearted.”)

The feather of Ma’at was adopted as a personal emblem of rock musician Robert Plant for use on the Led Zeppelin album “Four.”

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Ma’at
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Related Symbols:
TyetThrone of isis

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This gigantic earthwork best known as the “Uffington Horse,” is located on a hillside in Oxfordshire, England, and dates to the Bronze age. Measuring almost four hundred feet long, the figure was created by filling dug trenches with powdered chalk.

The horse is one of many chalk figures scatted across the English countryside. It has been speculated that the horse is possibly a remnant of worship of the Celtic Goddess Epona, or the sun God Belenus. Others note the extended tail and contend that the “horse” is actually a dragon.  The figure may be a remnant part of a giant zodiac comprised of chalk figures, the majority of which are now missing.

Ballymote
Related Symbols:
celticcelticceltic

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